parallel economy and purpose

We do not quite grasp yet the ways infotech and biotech will shape humanity by the middle of this century, and we are already struggling to find a political model for the world of today. Those two observations taken together, project a somehow alarming view of our immediate future. It sounds like we are walking over a narrow railway bridge and we already see the train coming round the hill towards us.

The most shocking foresight confront us with a near future where most of humankind will be of no use to society. Where all we will need will be procured by thinking machines. And at best only few of us will be needed to get that wave started and moving. A world with an almost full unemployment is something no known culture, religion or political system is able to envision and to cope with.

If liberalism, nationalism, Islam or some novel creed wishes to shape the world of the year 2050, it will need not only to make sense of artificial intelligence, Big Data algorithms and bioengineering–it will also need to incorporate them into a new meaningful narrative.

“21 Lessons for the 21st Century”, Yuval Noah Harari

A world with almost full unemployment will also face the need to redefine currency; exchange will lose meaning if no one can be of use to society. If all everyone needs is provided for by a horde of autonomous machines, we will have nothing of value in our hands to exchange for those goods. Some higher authority will decide at some point what we get and what we do not get. 

So here we are, the last generation of a worldview that endured many millennia, saw many wars, reached unparalleled prosperity, and finally, was left in stupor looking at a future for what no explanation was available. No wonder we stick our heads under the ground—in diversion. In this state of bliss, let me adventure a model of economy for the end of the century.

Human centric professions and jobs will likely be needed, at least until we can develop affection with machines and we can be fooled to believe they correspond us. But apart of those, it is difficult to think of what professions may be required thirty years form now. Our needs satisfied, yet not clear how are we meant to pay for them, but restless like an early retirement nightmare that starts at the end of our education, if we need such thing any more.

Yet we will, once more, adapt and survive. We will start creating with our hands again. Craftsmanship will be reborn. And all that what we will do with our hands, rescuing wisdom of old, recreating old technologies and old methods long forgotten, will become value, will become currency. And our work will once more become our source of pride and will produce us pleasure. We will exchange once more goods. Goods in a parallel economy with an inherent value equivalent to the time and the energy we will put in our creations, but most importantly yet, the passion and love that we will put in them too.

i will make it worse

but I want to share this with you.

I apologize to the author for my blunt attempt to translate his perfect choice of words.

Wörter besitzen Macht. Durch die Wortwahl werden Bilder erzeugt, die Gefühle und Gedanken auslösen. Und schon entstehen Haltungen und Meinungen, mal zufällig und unbedacht, mal gezielt und absichtlich.

Matthias Klaus

Source: DW Deutsche Welle

 

Words are mighty. By choosing them, we induce impressions in people’s minds that lead to feelings and thoughts. Incidentally opinions and attitudes will follow due. And they words came out of a chance event or were otherwise darted with intent.

This year that ought not be, has been, and will at last come to an end. It is high time to impress these words in our minds and be critical and inquisitive with what we read, or hear. For it is everybody’s duty to search the truth and act accordingly to our principles.

eyes not connected to brains

Ten or eight years ago, we heard of twitter and facebook. We already had forums, email, myspace, chatrooms. Twitter and facebook were however sleek, fancy and intuitive. We embraced them and set our social groups; family, friends, even people out of our circles that we admired and now we could read their thoughts in a very direct way. Smartphones became ubiquitous shortly after, and all that internet social connectivity and goodness was now very close to us. At all times.

We learned to appreciate those spaces. They became intimate and we happened to open up to strangers too in those circles, and the world was great, exciting and promising. The promise of connecting people across boundaries, races, ideologies, religions.

Slowly, uninvited “others” started gaining space in our intimate places, whose we did not invite. First an annoyance, yet only a small annoyance. Still we could carry on if only we were ignoring those small interjections that month by month were gaining more social real state in our until now perceptively intimate spaces.

At some point, the sheer amount of information that started finding its way into our now quite crowded social spaces became out of control. We anxiously tried to keep at pace with our timelines, and at last, we became disconnected from our families, friends, and those spread about the world whom we devoted admiration.

There must be a point where our brains are clogged with so much information that reach to us, that we cannot anymore see what we want to look at. Our eyes are not anymore connected to our brains. And we start living in a reality that we do not perceive through our eyes but is being described to us by those uninvited “others”.

Those “others” simply pay to push information to us. And incidentally their agendas do not necessarily keep our best interests, or the best interests of our families and friends at its core. In the best case, they only want to make us believe we need something we didn’t know even existed until now, and it may be a great discovery though! In the worst case they may have more obscure aims.