trespassing into nature

When framing a house, one will, despite styles and epochs, often be able to discern if the house is cut out from its environment or if it provisions for a twilight zone between inside or outside. Whereas Claypots Castle would be by design cut out from its surroundings, la Maison de la Reine in the Petit Trianon would show quite the opposite design.

These same characteristics are also reflected in houses of lower budget. Balconies in city apartments are a design made to provide an escape away from the post-modernism of our city dwellings today. It is not surprising that we will more often that not be inclined to grow nature in our balconies; our small outlets to nature.

It is, however, not only our longing for contact with nature that makes the Maison de la Reine especially desirable to us, but an invisible part of our nature has been cut off from us in our modern life aseptic housing. Aseptic in a metaphorical sense but also in a microbiological sense too.

Building materials are treated to diminish anything microbial, and like antibiotics these methods are non-selective; they might kill the pathogens, but they also kill microbes that are beneficial to human survival and well-being.

Elizabeth Henaff

In our fight to put down the sickening bacteria in mold, we created antibiotic housing were the much necessary microbes we very much need to live, have a hard time living with us.